CO2 Calculator

Directions: Type the energy value from your bill or records into the left column. Then click anywhere outside the cell you just filled. The answer will appear in the column to the right.

 Energy Value

Conversion Factor

 Result
kWh mains electricity

* 0.43 =

kgCO2
kWh natural gas

* 0.19 =

kgCO2
therms natural gas

* 5.50 =

kgCO2
litres gasoil or diesel

* 2.68 =

kgCO2
litres of petrol

* 2.31 =

kgCO2
litres of LPG

* 1.51 =

kgCO2
tonnes of coal

* 2,419 =

kgCO2
miles in a petrol car

* 0.36 =

kgCO2
miles on a train or bus

* 0.1 =

kgCO2
miles in an aeroplane

* 0.29 =

kgCO2

Total emissions: kgCO2

equivalent to kg Carbon

Bear in mind that around half UK CO2 emissions come from industry and commerce, supporting our everyday lifestyle. So if your personal profile comes out below about 3,000 kg CO2 (3 tonnes), you are doing reasonably well by UK standards, but would still need to do more to be a good global citizen!

All data in this table is based upon official UK data from the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, revised March 2001. Emissions for other fuels can be found on DEFRA's Environmental Reporting page. Figures in red are updated from the initial version of this page which used June 1999 data. For other countries, the electricity component would need to be adjusted based upon primary fuel mix.

For electricity generated from renewable sources, zero carbon dioxide emissions may be used if the supply has been certified by OFGEM.

The car mileage figure is based upon an average UK family car returning 29mpg. If you drive a smaller car achieving (say) 40mpg, or regularly share a car, then you could adjust the mileage accordingly to estimate CO2 emissions.

Aeroplane emissions are very hard to estimate. The figure above is based upon short-haul (European) flights in economy class - add up to 50% for business class travel with lower seat densities. However there is some evidence that there is at least as much Global Warming effect again from other aircraft emissions in the upper atmosphere, such as ozone created from NOx or condensation trails, than solely from the CO2 emitted on the journey.